Early Stethoscopes

One of the few scenes in my sweet romance The Curious Profession of Dr. Craven that gets close to hot is where Richard (Dr Craven) listens to Henrietta’s heart (Properly chaperoned, of course). Before the invention of the stethoscope the doctor had to put his ear on his patients’ chest. This could be a tad embarrassing, especially when the patient was young, pretty and female.

RC76_3_L3_1819_planche_I_big

Rene Laennec solved this problem with a wooden tube. The figure above, from 1819, shows that very quickly after that doctors learned to distinguish between different sounds. It was not simply the muscle making noise, but valves and things like that. Not that they could do much about it, but it was a start.

Author: rharrisonauthor

International man of mystery. Well not really, although I can mangle several languages and even read the occasional hieroglyphic. A computer scientist, an author and one of the very few people who has both an NIH grant and had a book contract. An ex- booktrope author and a photographer.

2 thoughts on “Early Stethoscopes”

    1. Thank you for reading. The side effect of actually making diagnosis better is an entirely unintended consequence. It’s also the reason Dr’s started wearing top-hats. They could put the pieces of their stethoscope in it.

      Like

Comments are closed.

Kevin Drum

Cats, charts, and politics

Moosmosis

Global Health and Education

She Reads Reviews

Historical Fiction, YA, Fantasy, Contemporary, Literary, and Non-fiction Book Reviews

Makabiyahe

To Travel, To Explore

Bedrock & Paradox

I dream of a hard and brutal mysticism in which the naked self merges with a non-human world and yet somehow survives still intact, individual, separate. Paradox and bedrock.

Opulence

Freelancing, Art, and Side Hustles

Blog about Mexico's Must Have Seen

Playa del Carmen, Tulum, Cancun, Riviera Maya, Cenotes, Sian Ka'an, Cozumel, Bacalar, Mahahual, Monterrey...

Disturbed Literature

Writings of Jambo Stewart

J. A. Allen

Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins

O at the Edges

Musings on poetry, language, perception, numbers, food, and anything else that slips through the cracks.

Laugh With Me

This WordPress.com site is the bee's knees

Little Fears

Tales of humour, whimsy and courgettes

charles french words reading and writing

An exploration of writing and reading

%d bloggers like this: