The Cranes are Back.

I was worried with the drought that the birds would skip us by. It seems they haven’t.

They were flocking over Lake Weiss this morning. Several small flocks of cranes and a huge flock of pelicans.

The featured image is from last year. More, I hope, this year to come.

Long term review of the Opteka 500mm lens

About a year ago i purchased one of these lenses to take pictures of wildlife. opteka

I now have enough experience to write a review.

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turkey

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Good points:

  • Inexpensive. $140 on Amazon. A “real” Nikon lens can run into the thousands.
  • Works. It does what it says. It will bring things into close focus. Including things you don’t want to get too close to.
  • Small, light and maneuverable A conventional telephoto lens is much longer and heavier.
  • Close focus You can focus on surprisingly close objects. This makes it great for taking pictures of things that don’t appreciate humans getting up close and personal.

Bad points:

  • Weakly coupled to the camera. Everything is manual, including exposure.
  • No autofocus. This limits its use in rapidly changing situations. Following a moving bird for example.
  • Paper-thin focus. Be prepared to take several photos to get the focus right
  • Infinity is not set at infinity on the lens. Don’t assume the stars are in focus.
  • The 2x extender leads to barrel distortions.

I generally use it with a fast shutter exposure (1/4000 s) to avoid blur and then control the exposure with the camera’s “film speed” setting. In bright light that’s about 2000ASA. In dim light, you may have to play around.

It’s also critical to make sure that the T-mount is firmly screwed into the lens. If it comes loose you won’t be able to focus.
This picture shows what I mean by paper thin focus:
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Note that I’ve focused on one wing of the butterfly and the other wing is completely out of focus.

This picture of an alligator and heron show the same effect at a longer distance.
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It should look like this:
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It can be an advantage to have a thin focus. The bird is clear and the reeds have disappeared.
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It’s great for taking pictures of things that aren’t moving too quickly, like this female cardinal.
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And you can get some great effects:
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In summary, you get what you pay for. It works. There are several things that could be better, but you have to fork over the cash. I wouldn’t use it for rapidly changing things like sports or moving creatures. But if you have the time to focus and remember to take several shots, it’s a great little lens.

Sandhill Cranes #birding

The Sandhill Cranes overwinter in northern Alabama near Weiss Lake. The flocks have been getting bigger as the word seems to be spreading among them. They concentrate on damp/flooded cotton and soybean fields where they can find various small creatures to eat.

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While we were parked and taking photographs several flocks flew in to join the main one. They spread out in the morning and then gather together. The next few shots show the process.

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They aren’t spooked by cars, so you can quietly pull off the road, turn off your engine and take pictures. These were with a relatively inexpensive 500mm mirror lens.

Wild Turkeys #birding

They’re back, they’re bold, and they’re native.DSC_0259
The turkeys are forming up into mixed flocks with several toms and a larger number of hens. In the next month they’ll partition into individual flocks with just one tom each. After the eggs hatch, we’ll see flocks of the chicks accompanying their father.
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What the Thrush Said

John Keats, 1795 – 1821

O Thou whose face hath felt the Winter’s wind,
Whose eye has seen the snow-clouds hung in mist,
And the black elm tops ’mong the freezing stars,
To thee the spring will be a harvest-time.
O thou, whose only book has been the light
Of supreme darkness which thou feddest on
Night after night when Phœbus was away,
To thee the Spring shall be a triple morn.
O fret not after knowledge—I have none,
And yet my song comes native with the warmth.
O fret not after knowledge—I have none,
And yet the Evening listens. He who saddens
At the thought of idleness cannot be idle,
And he’s awake who thinks himself asleep.

(i know the featured image isn’t a thrush, but a wren looks better)
DSC_0007 Here’s a wood-thrush from my feeder.

More Birds.

Playing with my long (500mm) cheap mirror lens again. I set the shutter speed to 1/4000 (as fast as the Nikon will go) and let the auto-ISO handle the rest. It has a relatively fast f5.6 that cannot be changed.  The other caution to watch for is the T-mount. It can unscrew a little and loosen while the lens is on the camera if it isn’t in tight.  That will cause difficulty with focusing.

We have resident pelicans. They are supposed to be rare. Ours aren’t.

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The herons perch on stumps out in our little branch of Lake Weiss.

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The image quality isn’t perfect, but it could be a lot worse. Not sure how much is the lens and how much is the ISO/low light.

 

The Desolate Field

William Carlos Williams

Vast and gray, the sky
is a simulacrum
to all but him whose days
are vast and gray, and—
In the tall, dried grasses
a goat stirs
with nozzle searching the ground.
—my head is in the air
but who am I…?
And amazed my heart leaps
at the thought of love
vast and gray
yearning silently over me.

Cranes in a cotton field near Centre.
(c) 2015 Robert Harrison